Archive for ‘LGBTQetc’

January 7, 2011

Pretty Little Liars: New Years Fireworks

by d

NOTE: Hard to keep a secret in a photo booth.

Subterfuge reviews ABC Family‘s Pretty Little Liars, complete with actresses too old to be high schoolers. Season 2, episode 1, “Moments Later.”

It’s back, and they started with a bang! Technically, last season ended with a bang, too–Hannah being hit by a car.

Here is what is relevant for our feminist readers:

1) Emily told her father she’s gay.

Her father, who has been on active duty for ages and just returned home a few weeks ago, could be a hard-line military man. He goes in to ask her what’s bothering her, thinking it’s to do with a boy who’s gotten himself into trouble. Because he won’t leave her alone, gotta protect his little girl, he can see that she’s afraid of something… she tells him. He sits down on her bed, clearly shocked, and the scene cuts.

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December 10, 2010

Politics and Outrage: 12/09/10

by V
via David Horsey

via David Horsey

Management would like to introduce a segment called Politics and Outrage. This segment will link newsworthy items along with commentary. We SHOULD care about the news. We hope this segment will spark lively discussion in the comments.

This segment will run as often as V will write it for us.

Fox News advocates murder and assassination on air — This is mostly a video, and at first I was only going to show the YouTube link, but I liked what the blogger had to say about the video. Nothing like calls for murder and the stifling of free speech to start your day, right Faux Fox?

Sign of the Devil…or perhaps just encouragement — Apparently, some people (and school officials) in a Utah town dislike the idea of their elementary school kids seeing the word, “suicide” on someone’s signs on their own private property. At first, this makes sense. Until you stop and think for a moment, and realize that even elementary school kids can and have committed suicide before (although perhaps not necessarily for THIS purpose) and the man has his eye on the future — starting positive messages NOW rather than waiting until its already too late.

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December 8, 2010

The State of Anime Today

by V
collage Pictures, Images and Photos

via Photobucket user mathias611

Has anyone else noticed that the state of today’s anime is bland, having little or nothing to do with politics, or relevant issues of the times, compared to the way anime used to be back in the day?

Have you ever thought that some people take their entertainment too seriously? That, for some reason, they cannot enjoy something as lovely as anime without having to thrust politics, current issues, and other such things? I have had that thought, too. But, I see now where I had not been engaging my brain! Let me explain.

A few days ago, perhaps even a week or so ago, I discussed anime with Roxy. She and I have very similar views and political beliefs. The discussion was really just meant to be light-hearted, an exchanging of views. But, I took it too seriously and it began to quickly irritate me. I won’t lie, it was mostly because at the heart of the discussion seemed to lie my favorite anime as of the moment (and last year or so!). I saw it as dissing my favorite anime, and I kept thinking, “Why does this have to be about such things? Why can’t we just watch something to get away from the real world and politics and current events/issues? Why can’t we just have simple fun with an anime? Doesn’t she realize that this is important, too?” This is just an excuse for my irrationality. I was upset over anime. Anime! I was taking things too personally. This was not only silly, it was ridiculous.

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November 22, 2010

by V
When the comments first started rolling in, we were still operating under old assumptions and worked from that point. 

Now we’ve reread it critically and realized that what it actually says is not what we originally read it as. That’s our mistake. And it’s our fault for not treating it more responsibly.

We cannot keep this up so long as it has the potential to hurt another reader. However, the comments will remain on the post as taking them down would be dishonest.

Your editors are now taking a break from Subterfuge for the indeterminate future. We thank you for reading and we wish you all the best.

[Update: The editorial  response is here.

Due to points raised by commentators  — for which we thank you — the editors here at Subterfuge are reviewing the post and the editorial process. We have striven to create a space where our contributors can be honest. We acknowledge that we neglected our editorial duties by not ensuring that the facts given in this opinion piece were backed up.We ask that new comments on this piece include recommendations for further reading and study.

A longer and more detailed response is coming.

Please believe us when we say that it has never been our intention to hurt. Mea culpa.

-The Editors, D & F

November 5, 2010

My son is gay (via Nerdy Apple Bottom)

by d

I’m re-blogging this because it’s important, and it’s awesome.

This blogger, Nerdy Apple Blossom, has a son who is five years old. He wanted to be Daphne for Halloween this year. She had no problem with it, and he was initially ecstatic. It was only as the big day approached that he began to worry. She reassured him, but he still feared that he would be laughed at.

Instead of children teasing other children (which may not have had the ‘you’re gay and going to HELL!’ connotation) they were BOTH treated to a round of busybody mothers who felt it was their business to critique.

NAB’s response is wonderful. Her son is going to grow up to be a brave, confident young man, because he has witnessed his mother do that very thing. I hope he was able to enjoy the rest of the day. And I hope he got LOTS of candy.

My son is gay

My son is gay.

Or he’s not. I don’t care. He is still my son. And he is 5. And I am his mother. And if you have a problem with anything mentioned above, I don’t want to know you. I have gone back and forth on whether I wanted to post something more in-depth about my sweet boy and his choice of Halloween costume. Or more specifically, the reactions to it. I figure if I’m still irked by it a few days later, I may as well go ahead and post my thoughts. Here are th … Read More

via Nerdy Apple Bottom

November 4, 2010

What have I done?

by f

Remember that I had a brilliant series about gay teenagers that I absolutely had to share with all of you?

I had it all figured out. I was going to write emotionally and at length about the issue. There was so much for me to talk about, a trail of injustices to chronicle. And then… the world happened. The It Gets Better project has since skyrocketed — even President Obama made his own “It Gets Better” movie — throwing a million diverse experiences into the mix. There isn’t one great standard to which to these stories can be held. So I’m going to watch all of them.

Yes, you’re right. Each and every goddamn one of them.

I’ve seen around two hundred so far. At times they are tough to watch. I can’t believe that we tolerate this prejudice as a society. Talking about wanting gay students to commit suicide is almost acceptable. “I don’t want to be a homo,” is the last accepted bigoted phrase there is.

So after all of my writing and thinking and feeling and grasping, I’ve only found that the issues are more complex than I’d ever imagined. The recent ouster of judges from Iowa is further evidence of this — and a huge setback for gay rights in this country. Not since 1952, since the system was designed, have judges been voted out of power.

The House is in very Republican territory now. Republicans are not known for their powerful stance on gay rights. In fact, their powerful stance is an unequivocally negative one. If they must exist, they must remain like children — seen and not heard. This is the basis for countless legislation against gay marriage and in support of DADT. Laura Wood, our favorite housewife, sums it up best; she says what most Republicans say off camera (unless you’re Carl Paladino, and then you don’t care):

Our president is a bully who flagrantly violates his mandated role. The U.S. Constitution did not appoint him therapist to the nation’s children. The voters did not elect him to be dad. This is an outrageous assertion of power. He is a bully to parents in their own homes and a bully to children as well, exhibiting shocking insensitivity to the dilemmas and conflicts of adolescence and feeding them blatant lies. This president is a bully and a sentimental idiot all at once. He is an embarrassment to everything good this country represents.

What is everything good this country represents? Oh, you mean the exclusionary bullshit that we’ve had to apologize for over the course of two and a half centuries?

November 3, 2010

Class Reflection: Sex in the Victorian Era

by feyruhan
Cover of "Tipping the Velvet: A Novel"

Cover of Tipping the Velvet: A Novel

Psychological Aspects of Human Sexuality

Class reflection: Sex in the Victorian Era.

There was *sex* in the *Victorian Era*?  Gasp!

I had heard of John Ruskin before, in a literature class at my previous college.  We were assigned an essay of his, I believe it was Lilies and Sesame Seeds, and I had a hard time getting through it because I found Ruskin’s message so infuriating.  Later, when we discussed the essay (and the essayist) in class, the professor (or maybe it was one of the students? Hm…) shared with us that poor old John had run away from his wife on their wedding night when he found, to his horror, that she had pubic hair.  It was bad enough that his wife had pubic hair, but the concept it implied was even worse: women, in general, had pubic hair.  Pubic hair was notably absent from all images of women he had ever seen, and the absence of it somehow epitomized to Ruskin the un-sexed nature of the “fairer sex.”  What could possibly be more mortifying to a man who so deeply perceived women as nonsexual, child-like in their simplicity, purity, and power of reasoning, than to discover—on his wedding night—that women, his simple play-thing, are in fact whole and sexual beings?

There was a lot of noise made, in the Victorian Era, about homosexuality: its wrongness, its rightness, its illness and its naturalness.  That is, the wrongness or rightness of male homosexuality.  Has anyone read or heard of Tipping the Velvet?  It’s a novel, a historical romance novel of some four-hundred and eighty pages, written and published in the last ten years—which should mean it has no relevance to this discussion, since it’s a work of fiction, right?  Wrong-o!  The book takes its title (Tipping the Velvet) from a term of the era in which it is set, the 1880’s—late Victorian times—a term referring to cunnilingus (oral sex performed on a woman); the term itself, which deceptively sounds like a boring aspect of millinery, was used by women of a sapphist persuasion.  That is to say, lesbians.  Victorian Era lesbians.  Yes, the Victorian Era had its lesbians, and they had their own hidden, under-the-radar, legally reprehensible but not legally recognized (that is to say, there were sodomy laws for homosexual men but no laws set out for homosexual women; Queen Victoria is supposed to have dismissed the possibility of female homosexuality when it was brought to her in legal concerns; “female homo-what?” was more or less her attitude), sub-culture.

The Victorians, thanks to England’s Queen Victoria and others, were known for a reserved attitude towards sex, sexuality, and all things involving the (female) body.  It’s interesting to notice that a (modern/contemporary) leading lingerie company—the opposite to a reserved attitude on sex, sexuality, and all things involving the female body—is named Victoria’s Secret.

October 16, 2010

Religious Hatred Redux: Dan Savage is a Genius.

by f

 

Dan Savage

 

I’m sorry I’ve been away. Though my stomach problems have continued through the week, I think I’m starting to recover now. (Knock on wood — I was bad and had a limoncello mousse with graham cracker crust, though, so my progress remains to be seen.)

I’ll get back to the business of writing about things in earnest.

Before the hour strikes midnight, though, I want to share two important things with you.

Three days ago, Dan Savage answered a question from a Christian reader who claimed that although he condemned homosexuality, he did not support violence against gay teens. Savage’s response was swift, brutal, and awesome.

A question: Do you “support” atheist marriage? Interfaith marriage? Divorce and remarriage? All are legal, all go against Christian and/or traditional ideas about marriage, and yet there’s no “Christian” movement to deny marriage rights to atheists or people marrying outside their respective faiths or people divorcing and remarrying.

Why the hell not?

Sorry, L.R., but so long as you support the denial of marriage rights to same-sex couples, it’s clear that you do believe that some people—straight people—are “better or more worthy” than others.

It gets better from there. Savage also says that considering gay people as “unworthy of full civil equality” is equal to the claim that gays are unequal and therefore less worthy than straight people (countering an assertion made by the OP in the last line of his letter).

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October 14, 2010

It Gets Better

by d

Dan Savage is one of my favorite people. I never miss a Savage Love column.

He is a gay man, in a long-term relationship with his partner. They have a son. They are a happy, stable, loving family.

But their lives weren’t always so pleasant.

And that is why Dan has founded the It Gets Better Project, to reach out to young people who feel hopeless. It is for LGBTQ kids, but also for anyone who has suffered bullying or public shaming. The message is simple, and heartfelt. It gets better. You won’t always in middle or high school, you won’t always live with a family that doesn’t understand. The plea is wrought with emotion: Stick around, don’t give up on life before it can get better!

Below the cut are embedded videos, amazing videos submitted by people who want to tell kids that it gets better. Or, watch them all here: http://www.youtube.com/user/itgetsbetterproject

http://www.itgetsbetterproject.com/

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September 29, 2010

Whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers of mine

by f

Tyler Clementi

I’m not one to quote Scripture, but I’ll do it because Colbert has, and it’s fucking important. Tomorrow I will discuss Tyler Clementi. Tomorrow, I will discuss why he felt that life was no longer worth living. Tomorrow, I will discuss why blue-ribbon schools produce sociopaths. And then I will talk about what a dearth of love there is in the world, that such things are allowed to happen.

But in the meanwhile, I’m going to cry my eyes out, because such things should not be happening on my college campus. I understand how high schools could have produced such assholes, but I do not understand why it had to happen at a college, which at the very least is supposed to be an improvement on high school.  I’m in such shock. For people who think it is ridiculous that I should be this shocked about a person completely unrelated to me, I give you the awesomeness that is Stephen Colbert.

When asked by Representative Chin (CA-33) why Colbert devoted his time to the migrant cause, the former Sunday School teacher responded: “Whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers of mine, you did for me.” (Matthew, 25). It was an incredible, quiet moment of testimony that gave the Scripture-loving political bigots a moment of stunned pause.

I would like to think that — given a change of preposition from for to to — the statement would be the same. Whatever was done to Clementi was a grave harm done to everyone who has suffered as he had, powerless and incapable of capturing the attention of others. Instead, Colbert reminds us that whomever we fight for has to be first (and foremost) for the least of our brothers. Because if we don’t, we cannot wash the blood off our hands.

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